Meet Our Fellows

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"I have long believed that in order for children of color to be successful in educational settings, they must see themselves in the leaders they encounter and in the materials used to teach them."

Kavetta Anderson

Third-year teacher at Buford Middle School
Teaching License: Secondary English
College: University of Virginia
Route to licensure: Earning a license as part of a two-year PG/MT program

When Kavetta first developed her life’s plan, she had a single goal: to become a lawyer. But after eye-opening experiences as a student at a Title I high school, she became passionate about being an advocate for young people. By the end of her undergraduate career, Kavetta decided that the Curry School’s post-graduate Master in Teaching program would give her the best preparation for teaching excellence. She also works and volunteers in the local community.

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"I want to be a teacher because I want to have a direct influence on how students learn, grow, and become citizens."

Brandon Readus

Fourth-year teacher at Woodbrook Elementary School
Teaching License: PK-6
College: Longwood University
Route to licensure: Earned a teaching license as part of a four-year degree

Brandon Readus has known that he wanted to be a teacher since his high school days when he worked with first graders as a teacher cadet. Brandon enjoys knowing that as an elementary school teacher, his impact will pave the way for a generation of leaders in every field. He became a Fellow during his junior year at Longwood University, after learning about the support AATF provides. And although it is with the utmost seriousness that he enters the field, Brandon is hilarious, often providing comic relief to meals, van trips, and Fellow workshops.

These are just a few of the individuals that are a part of the AATF family, and in our cadre virtually no two paths are the same. Some of our Fellows are becoming licensed through online programs, others have become teachers after serving as teaching assistants for years in our community, taking a few courses each semester. Many of our Fellows grew up in Charlottesville, Albemarle, or the surrounding counties and others have moved here just to teach. But they all have two things in common: they are working to earn teaching licenses, and they are committed to starting their teaching careers in our community.